Skip to main content

About your Search

20121222
20121230
STATION
CSPAN 8
CSPAN2 8
KPIX (CBS) 3
CNNW 2
KQED (PBS) 2
KRCB (PBS) 2
KTVU (FOX) 2
MSNBCW 2
CNBC 1
KGO (ABC) 1
KICU 1
KQEH (PBS) 1
LANGUAGE
English 34
Search Results 0 to 33 of about 34 (some duplicates have been removed)
CSPAN
Dec 27, 2012 1:00am EST
. she has 51 of honorary degrees. she has been the first of everything -- the national science foundation. she was the very first black woman to get a ph.d. at and i.t.. [applause] she is an expert in medicare and medicaid and all things health. she has been called the health czar of america. the point guard over hauling the system. how about that for a job? what a powerhouse right here. so we actually have a lot of brainpower up here. all of you could have done very different things. you had a lot of choices. i would love to hear about how you ended up taking what you did. who wants to start? >> a failed of violinist. i was raised to be a musician. my mother still asks may what happened. i was always interested in politics and writing stories for the paper. it actually was complete serendipity. i was in college and was at a meeting of the naacp. we had some big issues. this was the 1960's and we heard music down the hall. it was the college radio station and i was drawn to it. i pitched in and begin programming classical music. and they needed somebody to help with the news. i
CSPAN
Dec 25, 2012 10:00am EST
and steady passions and interests, to that extent, there will be a new science of politics. the science of politics based on what all human beings have in common, acknowledged supplied by the senses. because people do not agree about religious truths, and because they fight over their disagreements, social tranquility is served by regarding religion as voluntary matter for private judgment. not state-supported and state enforced. in the interest of social peace, the higher aspirations of the ancient political philosophers were pushed to the margins of modern politics. those aspirations were considered, at best, unrealistic. at worst, downright dangerous. henceforth, politics would not be a sphere in which human nature is perfected. political project would not include appointing people towards their highest potentials. instead, a modern politics would be based on the assumption that people will express and will act upon the strong impulses of their flawed nature's. the ancients had asked, what is the highest of which mankind is capable? how can we pursue this in politics? hobbes asked, w
CSPAN
Dec 24, 2012 12:00pm EST
and time she was putting into her appearance. >> i want to move to science. it is such a huge thing these days about the lack of women in science. in some universities, only 10% of the teachers are female. what can we do to get more women motivated to go into science and why is it important? >> >> talk about why they are not there first. it begins very early in terms of which women are exposed to, the expectations. it is a lot of hard work. science is a funny business because one is not always in the limelight. that is kind of public affirmation that is not there until one is a fair distance down the road and becomes an instant entrepreneur or something like that. a lot of what happens to women will happen within the community within which they work. a lot of the attitudes get reinforced. i think what needs to happen is we have to try to reach young women early. we have to affirm them. as a society, we have to value science and those who do it more. everything we like to play with, including broadcast media and health care, they are rooted in scientific discovery and technological i
CSPAN
Dec 29, 2012 4:20pm EST
the sciences and humanities, which i don't think should be separated but often are, and let with other colleagues and researchers and create interesting collaborations. thank you so much. perhaps very appropriately, the great new zealand bibliographer donald francis mackenzie said if you know how to read it, every book is alive with the judgment of its maker. in the business of bibliography is learning how to read the human presences in every recorded task. and i think that we have certainly seen an example of how to recover those human judgments. those human presences through a capacious and db2 learned every article. he's he is the author of eight novels, two values in 10 volumes of essays in as many articles as some of our nations finest journals. a past deputy chairman of the national endowment for the humanities, he is the recipient of a national book critics circle award red the guggenheim and even a rock rockefeller award. when you think about his work in cytogenetics. i'm not entirely sure, but i'm sure that he can inform us about the nature of fiction, the book, and the future
CSPAN
Dec 24, 2012 8:00pm EST
expectancy. it was, and still is, an assumption that as science and the rationality -- as the disenchantment of the world's, pre-modern forces will lose their history. the two most important of these are religion. events refute the liberal expectancy. religion still drives history. religion is also central to the emergence of america's public philosophy. at the risk of offending specialists by distortion through compression, what we offer a very brief placement of americans foundries. machiavelli begins modern political philosophy. this spot is a convenient demarcation. the agents -- ancients saw to enlarge the likelihood of the emergence of noble leaders. machiavelli, however, took his bearings from people as they are. he defined the political project as making the best of this flawed material. he knew that nothing would ever be made from the crooked timber of humanity. machiavelli was no democrat. he reoriented politics towards accommodations, strong and predictable forces rising from a great constant, human nature common to all people in all stations. for 44 years, machiavelli and luther
CNN
Dec 28, 2012 9:00am PST
. you say that this is unsound science and potentially could lead to problems. why do you believe that there is not a value in at least looking at this gunman's dna? >> well, first of all, let me say that my heart goes out to all the people in newtown, connecticut. this was an horrific series of events. second of all, the major problem that i have as a geneticist is that it's impossible to gain much information with the sample size of one. so what you are looking at is one person's dna, and you're trying to say that it's different than other people. but you only have a sample size of one. >> would it be helpful, do you think, to look at the dna of other shooters of those from previous mass shootings? >> well, again, the problem is, we have probably less than five or even ten people that we're talking about. when studies -- accurate genetic studies are done on a whole population, we look for hundreds of different people, and you have to show a strong correlation with that. and the second problem would be what are we trying to look for? i mean, we're going -- the whole idea is you'r
CSPAN
Dec 24, 2012 7:00am EST
. so, yes, i am unaffiliated. host: here is the "christian science monitor," their cover. the new face of faith. what is happening in new england, the countries most secular region, may have a future of american religion. traditional religions are seeing their ranks thinned out while alternative churches are becoming more popular. the arc is symbolic of a transforming religious landscape in new england -- will read a little bit more from the magazine piece this morning to continue to give your thoughts on religion and whether it and loved politics. loraine and michigan. republican number. caller: it influences my voting because -- acs, like before, that is a religion. i should have a right to vote with our savior. a country founded on the bible is not a country at all -- makes it very clear. you have to have your belief system. without it, i think a that will exist. host: kathleen, of riverside, ohio. democratic caller. caller: i grew up catholic and went to catholic school but i am no longer a catholic. i would not define myself as a catholic. i got into comparative religious studies
CBS
Dec 26, 2012 5:30pm PST
have more gun violence. >> reporter: but a 2004 report by the national academy of science found that guns likely to be used in crimes were unlikely to be turned in at gun buybacks. the mayor says since 2009, los angeles has collected 8,000 guns at buybacks, a period in which violent crime in the city has dropped by 33%. >> this is part of a much bigger effort, a comprehensive effort to address gun and gang violence. and like i said, in the city of l.a., the proof is in the pudding. >> reporter: the line of cars stretched for six blocks as people waited up to three hours to turn in their guns. >> me turning my rifles in now is my sympathy card to connecticut. >> reporter: so many people are bringing their guns in here that l.a.p.d. officials say this is likely to be their most successful buyback ever. they expect to collect more than 2,500 guns before it's over. >> axelrod: john blackstone in los angeles, thank you. a sad sight here in new york today in a place that's seen its share of trouble lately. an endangered finback whale washed up alive on the beach oh the breezy point se
CSPAN
Dec 26, 2012 8:00pm EST
know science mismatch is a problem, that although blacks are more likely than whites to nature when they go to college, they're much less like you to get stem degrees, science engineering that degrees if they receive preference. university of virginia found to be taped to blacks or two students of any color, one who receives a preference, one who doesn't, the preference is a 40% larger chance of dropping out of science on this path through. mismatch also affects academic inclined students who receive much preferences for that to become university professors are going to academics someday. predominantly receive low academic grades, cluster at the bottom of the class in the side economics is not for them. the biggest mismatch experiment was in california were voters passed proposition 209 a large cause a natural experiment of what happens when preferences are banned from entire university system. the results aren't extremely curt for anyone who bothers to look. but then i have to nurse at implementation of research quality, the number of blacks in the university of california system
CSPAN
Dec 27, 2012 6:00am EST
research has been done, published in excellent journals. so we now know that science mismatch is a pervasive problem. although blacks are more like listen than similar whites to want to major in science and engineering when they go to college, they're much less likely to get what we call s.t.e.m. degrees if they receive a large preference. a study at the university of virginia found that if you take two blacks or two students of any color, one of whom receives a large presence, one whom momentum, the student who receives a preference has about a 0% larger -- 40% larger chance of dropping out on his way through. mismatch also accepts academically-inclined students who would like to go into academics someday but very predominantly receive low academic grades, cluster at the bottom of the class and decide that economics is not for them. the biggest mismatch experiment was in california where voters passed proposition 209, and we had a large quasi-natural experiment of what happens when racial preferences are banned from an entire university system. the results of prop 209 are ext
CBS
Dec 22, 2012 5:00am PST
you know science has come a long way and we know a lot more about mental illness and health in general. has health changed though. >> has our mental illness changed in this society or are we recognizing it more? >> we're definitely recognizing it more. if you take someone that's helpless and hopeless and that can occur when someone is depressed or frustrated and doesn't seek -- or someone's got a disorder and is about to go through the juvenile justice system, they feel so helpless no other skills they lash out. this year alone, 5,000 teenagers will commit suicide. 600,000 will attempt suicide and will need an emergency room visit. that statistic is 40 years old. for the last 40 years that's happened every year. we have a way of just ignoring this, of saying these kids are bad seeds or they're just very sick, when in reality, these are our children our sons and daughters, but just more importantly they sit in classes next to our sons and daughters around the world. >> one thing which joe biden's team will be looking at is mental health. what should tha
CBS
Dec 27, 2012 7:00am PST
reported in the history of science. the last ten years goes down as the hottest ten years recorded in the history of science and that means more wacky weather, more moisture, more energy. global warming is a misnomer. it should be called global swing. >> which means the world doesn't end tomorrow. it's just every little event is worse or inkre meantycrementally worse than before. >> you look at all the glaciers are receding. the ice caps has diminished by 50% just in the last 50 years. an area the size of united states in terms of ice disappeared this year over the polar ice caps. the seasons are changing. summer is longer winter is shorter, tropical diseases are moving north. all the indicators show that the earth is warming up and that's what's driving some of this wacky weather. >> duh that show more or could we snap back? >> get used to it. we could be experiencing more 100-year flooding storms, hurricanes because there's more energy circumstance lating. we could argue how much human activity is driving it but everybody agrees the earth is heating up ther
FOX News
Dec 27, 2012 1:00pm PST
him, nd he'll set money aside from his first day of work to his last, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >> announcer: 'tis the season of more-- more shopping, more dining out... and along with it, more identity theft. by the time this holiday season is over, an estimated 1.2 million identities may be stolen. every time you pull out your wallet, shop online or hit the road, you give thieves a chance to ruin your holiday. by the time you're done watching this, as many as 40 more identities may be stolen. you can't be on the lookout 24/7, but lifelock can. they're relentless about protecting your identity every minute of every day. when someone tries to take over your bank accounts, drain the equity in your home, or even tries to buy a car in your name, lifelock is on guard. and with lifelock's 24/7 alerts, they contact you by text, phone or email as soon as they detect suspicious activity in their network. lifelock wants you to be protected this holiday season, so they're giving you 60 days of protection risk-free. >> my years as a prosecutor taugh
KICU
Dec 25, 2012 11:30pm PST
and science editor john fowler ktvu news. >>> rescue crews spent the evening rescuing a horse. cracky the horse climbed up to the loft looking for more hay. he was stuck up there for three days. the horse is in good shape. >> officials at u.s. airways are looking into what caused one of it aircrafts to catch fire. it happened during maintenance check. the fire started in a small motor under the plane's trail. no one was aboard at the time. the plane was scheduled to fly to vancouver. passengers were put on another airplane craft two hours later. >>> there's word that mcafee is spending christmas in england. the pioneer wrote that he's safe in the country where he grew up. mcafee was born in england. the sun reports mcafee is hoping for a fresh start. mcafee has been in hiding from authorities in belize where he had been living. he is wanted for questioning in the death -- for the suspicious death of a neighbor. >>> ktvu's robert handa followed the mail carriers on their rout today. >> reporter: it's not exactly santa's sleigh but some san jose postal carriers including nancy ray hit
MSNBC
Dec 27, 2012 3:00am PST
aside from his first day of work to his last, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. ♪ let's stay together >>> when you look at this picture, what do you think? at what point was it taken? >> i think we were campaigning in iowa. >> so why were you hugging her so hard in iowa? >> because i love my wife. >> and also, i hadn't seen him in a while. when you're campaigning, we're two ships passing in the night. and the first time i saw him was when i walked on stage to greet him. and that's my honey giving me a hug. >> how do you keep the fire going? >> that's a good question. >> you know, we've been married now 20 years. >> mm-hmm. >> like every marriage, i think, you know, you have your ups and you have your downs. but if you work through the tough times, the respect and love that you feel deepens. >> and then there's a lot of laughter, you know. >> and you're funnier. >> yeah. for the most part. >> everybody thinks he's pretty funny. i'm funnier than people think. >> you are. >> that may be. you may be funnier than people think. >> barbara walters in th
FOX
Dec 25, 2012 10:00pm PST
gate, that's it. >> reporter: we saw this open topsighted seeing bus. health and science editor john fowler ktvu news. >>> rescue crews spent the evening rescuing a horse. cracky the horse climbed up to the loft looking for more hay. he was stuck up there for three days. the horse is in good shape. >> officials at u.s. airways are looking into what caused one of it aircrafts to catch fire. it happened during maintenance check. the fire started in a small motor under the plane's trail. no one was aboard at the time. the plane was scheduled to fly to vancouver. passengers were put on another airplane craft two hours later. >>> there's word that mcafee is spending christmas in england. the pioneer wrote that he's safe in the country where he grew up. mcafee was born in england. the sun reports mcafee is hoping for a fresh start. mcafee has been in hiding from authorities in belize where he had been living. he is wanted for questioning in the death -- for the suspicious death of a neighbor. >>> ktvu's robert handa followed the mail carriers on their rout today. >> reporter: it's not exa
CSPAN
Dec 23, 2012 12:00am EST
. and even scientifically. the japanese get their religion, can see how far advanced, in the sciences. the chinese can be a religion still today. they did flirt with a religion called communism for a number of years, but only became capitalists and doing well because basically they are rooted in cultures, and from the cultures you evolve all -- so i agree with you absolutely. and one which i forgot to mention was a -- when the slaves went to the americas and they found themselves being banned from studying -- from following their religion. so what they did is said, yes, master, we won't follow our religion but substituted the same for the deities. so until today you'll find st. lazareth. one of the healing sins, st. anthony, the lady of the candles, et cetera, et cetera. they went through that phase, and even evolved a means of re-creating images of their deities in slightly stylized mode so that they could claim that those figures stood for the things and that is how accomplished they were in creating human beings. still today you find this phase existing but also there was another p
MSNBC
Dec 28, 2012 4:00pm PST
things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. of green giant vegetables it's easy to eat like a giant... ♪ and feel like a green giant. ♪ ho ho ho ♪ green giant smoke? nah, i'm good. ♪ [ male announcer ] every time you say no to a cigarette, you celebrate a little win. nicoderm cq, the patch with time release smart control technology that acts fast and helps control cravings all day long. ♪ quit one day at a time with nicoderm cq. a body at rest tends to stay at rest... while a body in motion tends to stay in motion. staying active can actually ease arthritis symptoms. but if you have arthritis, staying active can be difficult. prescription celebrex can help relieve arthritis pain so your body can stay in motion. because just one 200mg celebrex a day can provide 24 hour relief for many with arthritis pain and inflammation. plus, in clinical studies, celebrex is proven to improve daily physical function so moving is easier. celebrex can be taken with or without food. and it's not a narcotic. you and your doctor should balance the
PBS
Dec 25, 2012 5:30pm PST
. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financialor literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations.ra and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation forr public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions captioned by media access group at wgbh access.wgbh.org
PBS
Dec 25, 2012 3:00pm PST
railway. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions captioned by media access group at wgbh access.wgbh.org >> this is "bbc world news america." funding of this is made possible by the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu, newman's own foundation and union bank. >> at union bank our relationship managers work hard to know your business. offering specialized solutions and capital to help you meet your growth objectives. we offer expertise and tailored solutions for small businesses and major corporations. what can we do for you? >> and now, "bbc world news america." >> egypt's new constitution is approved by more than 60% of voters who took part in the referendum. queen elizabeth h
CNN
Dec 26, 2012 6:00am PST
isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>> good morning, him ecarol costello. it's 30 minutes past the hour. time to check our top stories. we're 30 seconds away from the start of trading at the new york stock exchange. representatives from the new york national guard are ringing the opening bell today. [ bell ringing ] more than 4,000 guards and airmen helped the victims of superstorm sandy. investors are still concerned about the looming fiscal cliff. >>> blizzard warning in up to six states. in arkansas the national guard has been called to provide ambulance service for residents. heavy snow and strong winds will lead to whiteout conditions across the ohio river valley. the heaviest snow is expected to move into western pennsylvania and new york state this afternoon. >>> hundreds of american families wanting to adopt russian children may have their dreams dashed. they have given final approval for a ban on such adoptions, seen as payback for a recently signed u.s. law imposing travel and financial restrictions on human rights abusers in russia. >>>
ABC
Dec 25, 2012 2:05am PST
it will save you money, as well. >>> later on, what do you get when santa claus meets a science fiction fantasy? stay tuned for our "world news now" christmas tradition called "st. nick and the space nicks." i've never seen this. i'm very excited. >> you have your mug now and you're going to go through that. so you're officially part of the overnight family. you've been indoctrinated with us now. >> i'm happy to be here. >> merry christmas. always good to have you. but first, it is a white christmas for parts of the country. philadelphia and many cities in the northeast got a few inches of snow, but it won't last long due to a coming meltdown. >> it's part of a system that snarled traffic and delayed airline passengers. as abc's alex perez reports. >> reporter: blankets of snow from central new york to northern california, creating christmas chaos for some parts of the country. >> we're hoping we don't sit on the runway. we did that the last time. >> reporter: in chicago, paula and her three daughters arrived early for their christmas eve flight. they are among the millions taking to the crowde
FOX
Dec 26, 2012 7:00am PST
gifts but others say they have it down to a science. >> make it in, say you that don't want it and they exchange it or -- they usually give you store credit. they won't give you money back. >> don't take it back, that's rude, just give it to someone else. >> may work. other people say instead of trading something they donate their unwanted gifts to charity. >> stanford fans headed to this year's rose ball game to see the cardinals battle wisconsin. the stadium is having a face lift but the big project is taking longer than expected. project managers say it's not going to be finished until 2015. >>> san jose state will play in the military bowl. it'll face bowling green. a team that ranks 7th in the nation. experts prwill come away with the win. the military bowl is set to kick off tomorrow at noon. >> should be a lot of fun. we are keeping track on the traffic. we understand there is caltrain delays. >> up to an hourlong and this is because of a system wide mechanical failure. trains in the north and southbound direction are impacted. we have a lot of spin outs in the s
CNBC
Dec 24, 2012 9:00am EST
what happens, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense, from td ameritrade. >>> i'll tell you, it might be the middle of winter, but it's more like the cast of "some like it hot" here at the exchange. it's in french. i'll let you say the actual name of this group. a group of ballet enthusiasts founded in 1974, professional male dancers. everything from ballet to modern dance, classical, original works. it's definitely adding an air of levity to the occasion. in a couple seconds, the opening bell at the nyse. as we said, at the big board, the ballet from monte carlo. performing until january 6th in new york city. and over at the nasdaq, a group that does a lot of good work at this time of the year, the salvation army. >> some like it hot. >> interesting. >> the birth cage. bird cage. >> looking where we are opening, no surprise to the down side here. initially out of the gate, one of their biggest losers is microsoft, down by more than a percent. we were talking about whether or not there will be any upside to pc sales. a lot of the data points indicated by "the new york times"
CSPAN
Dec 26, 2012 9:00am EST
than politics. art, culture, religion, science, philosophy, sports. whether the empire got it right last week, whether or not the nature of dark matter is going to be first discovered by michael businesses rather than astrophysicists. this is all part of speech and thought that is protected by the first amendment. can't think of it just in political terms. then there's a third dimension, that speech is what allows you to define your persona and your personality. your speech, your thoughts, your belief, are who you are. and this is an essential human right. now, the supreme court in its first amendment case has protected speech. that is habeas -- habeas. we only get those cases. [laughter] >> we had a case recently protecting speech, video where there was described to me, i never look at these things, women in spiked heels killing little animals. we protected that. it was protected speech. we protected speech on the day of a funeral of a servicemen killed in the middle east. there were protesters and using derogatory words about gays, saying that the military would be doomed because
CSPAN
Dec 25, 2012 5:00pm EST
, religion, science, philosophy, sports. whether the empire got it right last week, didn't call it second base. whether or not the nature of dark matter will be first discovered by microphysicists rather than astrophysicists. it's all part of the speech and thought and belief that's protected by the first amendment. you can't think of it just in political terms. it's important. and there's a third dimension. speech is what allows you to define your persona, your personality. your speech, your thought, your beliefs or who you are. and this is an essential human right. now, the supreme court in its first amendment cases has protected speech. that is hideous. we only get those cases we had a case recently protecting speech, videos, where it was described to me, i never look at these things, women in spikes heels killing little animals. we protected the oath. it was protected speech. we protected speech when on the day of a funeral of a service man killed in the middle east, there were protesters using derogatory words about gays, saying the military is all going to be doomed to predition bec
CSPAN
Dec 21, 2012 8:00pm EST
taking part in debates in school and college, they are often rather more about style than sub science. sometimes they appear to miss the point entirely. i remember at the student union, i was president once, we had a motion which instructed the united states to remove its troops instructed the united states that is a bit of big ask. here in this place, debates are different. debates have consequences. the most significant speeches are not necessarily the most stylish or the most fluid. they are the ones born of knowledge, of passion, of commit, and of concern. most of all, they are made by those who are here not only to speak for themselves, but to represent the people. todayed that is your opportunity, to speak out, based on your convictions and concerns to speak for young people whom you represent. and to speak out on issues which are relevant and where you can exert an influence inspect doing so, it will be in the best tradition of parliament democracy. before i finish, can i pay tribute to the administrate colleague. the administrate of children and families who is responsible for
CSPAN
Dec 21, 2012 11:00pm EST
of -- stems? raise your hand. stands for science, technology, engineering and math, and these are the jobs which are going to be around in the future. actual he the key jobs of the new jersey economy and we should all go to our local councils, our partner organizations, and we're trying to incorporate the significance of stem within schools and colleges around the city, and i challenge every single youth parliament member here today to go away to your cities and councils and partner organizations and try to encourage them to incorporate the significance of stem program within your schools and colleges and come back next year and share with us what you found. these are the jobs of the knowledge economy. >> now, i'm looking for a london woman. a london woman who has not spoken before. have you spoken before? you did. i think it wouldn't be fair to others. i thought you had spoken earlier. this woman is going to fall off her seat and i want to see that. that would be a sadness. >> i'm -- thank you, mr. speaker. thank you. [applause] >> anybody here who knows today that i was desperate to pike
CSPAN
Dec 28, 2012 2:00pm EST
.s. department of agriculture, social science analyst. thank you for being with us. >> thank you for having us. >> tomorrow, we will continue looking at fiscal cliff negotiations and how americans will be affected if the deadline passes. our guest will be joseph rosenberg, followed by a look by presidential campaigning and the influence of the electoral college. then a discussion on hurricane sandy relief funding. we will be joined by dan freed iedman. all that beginning at 7:00 a.m. eastern here on c-span. ♪ >> if we turn away from the needs of others, we align ourselves with those forces which are bringing about this suffering. >> the white house is a bully pulpit and you ought to take advantage of it. >> obesity is nothing short of a public health conference. >> i think i had little antennas go up that told me when somebody had there an agenda. >> it would be a shame to waste it. >> i think they serve as a window on the past to what was going on with american women. >> she becomes the chief confidante, really any way the only one in the world he could trust. >> they were writers, journali
Search Results 0 to 33 of about 34 (some duplicates have been removed)